Jack and the beanstalk

Jack and the beanstalk

Zoo: noisy peekaboo

The man explained to Juan that those beans were magic, and offered them in exchange for the cow. Juan accepted the exchange and returned home very happy with the bag of beans. His mother, disgusted by the boy’s foolishness, began to cry. Upset, she took the beans and threw them on the ground.

As soon as the giant fell asleep, Juan went out to pick up the gold coins, and ran to the plant, and then to his house. With the gold coins, they had enough money to live on for a long time.

John, for the third time, climbed up the branches of the plant, and climbed them until he reached the top. Then he saw the ogre put a little box in a drawer which, every time the lid was lifted, dropped a gold coin.

The mother came with the axe, and Juan, with a sure blow, cut the trunk of the magic bean. When it fell, the giant crashed, paying for his misdeeds, and Juan and his mother lived happily with the little box that, when opened, dropped a gold coin.

The tale of The Magic Beans is a fairy tale of English origin. Although this tale is erroneously attributed to Hans Christian Andersen, it is a story whose original author is unknown.

Ricitos de oro y los tres osos

Jack es un niño pobre que vive con su madre viuda y una vaca que es su única fuente de ingresos. Cuando la vaca deja de dar leche, la madre de Jack le dice que la lleve al mercado para venderla. En el camino, Jack se encuentra con un anciano que le ofrece judías mágicas a cambio de la vaca. Jack hace el intercambio.

Jack es un chico joven y pobre que vive con su madre viuda y una vaca que es su única fuente de ingresos. Cuando la vaca deja de dar leche, la madre de Jack le dice que la lleve al mercado para venderla. En el camino, Jack se encuentra con un anciano que le ofrece judías mágicas a cambio de la vaca. Jack realiza el intercambio.

The dynamics of folklore

Jack and the Beanstalk is an English tale of oral tradition, which has become a universal myth,[1] and continues to inspire editions, theatrical performances and motion pictures. Erroneously attributed to Hans Christian Andersen, the first literary version first appeared in 1730 in the book Round About our Coal-Fire: or Christmas Entertainments[2].

The tale was rewritten in 1807 by Benjamin Tabart in his version The History of Jack and the Bean-Stalk and later, in 1890, in its best-known version, by Joseph Jacobs in English Fairy Stories.[3] As she feeds him, the story is rewritten in the book «The History of Jack and the Bean-Stalk».

While she feeds him, the Ogre counts gold coins. When the Ogre falls asleep, Jack takes the opportunity to steal one of the sacks of gold and escape through the clouds. As he descends through the beanstalk, the weight of the sack forces him to drop the coins, which fall on the orchard like a shower of gold that the mother gathers in admiration. As soon as Jack steps on the ground, the bush disappears.

«Jack and the Beanstalk» is a very popular show in British cities as family comedy theater, always in a colorful and informal, even shameless style, which they call «Panto».

Masha and the bear

Jack climbs the beanstalk twice more.  He learns of other treasures and steals them when the giant sleeps: first a golden egg goose (Some versions turn the animal into a chicken.), And then, a harp that plays itself.  The giant wakes up when Jack leaves the house with the harp and chases Jack through the beanstalk.  Jack calls his mother to give him an axe and before the giant reaches the ground, he cuts down the beanstalk, causing the giant to fall to his death.  Jack and his mother live happily ever after with the riches Jack stole.

In some versions of the story, the giant has no name, but many works based on him name him Blunderbore. (A giant of that name appears in the 18th century tale of Jack the Giantkiller). In other versions the giant is called Gogmagog.

The giant’s cry «Fi-fa-fo-fum I smell the blood of an Englishman» appears in William Shakespeare’s King Lear in the form «Fie, Foh, and fum, I smell the blood of a British man.»  (Act 3, scene 4), and something similar also appears in Jack the Giant-Killer.

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