Great fire of london

Great fire of london online

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Detail of a 1666 painting of the Great Fire of London by an unknown artist, depicting the fire as it might have been observed from a ship. The Tower of London is on the right and London Bridge on the left, with St. Paul’s Cathedral in the background, surrounded by the higher flames.

The Great Fire of London was a devastating fire that swept through the City of London in England from September 2 to September 5, 1666.[a] The fire swept through the medieval City of London inside the ancient Roman wall. It threatened, but did not reach, the City of Westminster, Charles II’s palace of Whitehall or most of the suburban slums.[2] It destroyed 13,200 houses, 87 parish churches, St. Paul’s Cathedral and most of the city’s authority buildings. It is estimated that it destroyed the homes of 70,000 of the city’s 80,000 inhabitants.[3] The fire broke out in the early morning.

The fire broke out in the early morning of September 2, 1666. It started in Thomas Farriner’s bakery on Pudding Lane shortly after midnight on Sunday and spread rapidly. The use of the leading firefighting technique of the time, the creation of firebreaks by demolitions, was delayed due to indecision on the part of the Lord Mayor of London. By the time large-scale demolitions were ordered on Sunday night, the wind had already turned the house fire into a firestorm that defeated such measures. On Monday, the fire was pushed north, the heart of the city. Disorder began to break out in the streets over rumors that foreigners had started the fires. Suspicions centered on French and Dutch immigrants, England’s enemies from the ongoing Second Anglo-Dutch War; groups were the victims of lynchings and street violence.

great fire of new york, 1835

Detail of a 1666 painting of the Great Fire of London by an unknown artist, depicting the fire as it might have been observed from a ship. The Tower of London is on the right and London Bridge on the left, with St. Paul’s Cathedral in the background, surrounded by the higher flames.

The Great Fire of London was a devastating fire that swept through the City of London in England from September 2 to September 5, 1666.[a] The fire swept through the medieval City of London inside the ancient Roman wall. It threatened, but did not reach, the City of Westminster, Charles II’s palace of Whitehall or most of the suburban slums.[2] It destroyed 13,200 houses, 87 parish churches, St. Paul’s Cathedral and most of the city’s authority buildings. It is estimated that it destroyed the homes of 70,000 of the city’s 80,000 inhabitants.[3] The fire broke out in the early morning.

The fire broke out in the early morning of September 2, 1666. It started in Thomas Farriner’s bakery on Pudding Lane shortly after midnight on Sunday and spread rapidly. The use of the leading firefighting technique of the time, the creation of firebreaks by demolitions, was delayed due to indecision on the part of the Lord Mayor of London. By the time large-scale demolitions were ordered on Sunday night, the wind had already turned the house fire into a firestorm that defeated such measures. On Monday, the fire was pushed north, the heart of the city. Disorder began to break out in the streets over rumors that foreigners had started the fires. Suspicions centered on French and Dutch immigrants, England’s enemies from the ongoing Second Anglo-Dutch War; groups were the victims of lynchings and street violence.

plague of london

The Great Fire started in Thomas Farriner’s (or Farynor’s) bakery in Pudding Lane shortly after midnight on Sunday, September 2, and spread rapidly westward into the City of London (The City). The use of the leading firefighting techniques of the time, or the creation of firebreaks by demolition, were delayed due to the indecisiveness of the Lord Mayor of London, Sir Thomas Bloodworth. By the time large-scale demolitions were ordered on Sunday night, the wind had already fanned the fire in the bakery and such measures were ineffective. On Monday the fire advanced northward into the heart of the city. Order in the streets broke down due to rumors that foreigners had set the fire. This fear centered on the French and Dutch, enemies of England in the ongoing Second Anglo-Dutch War. These large immigrant groups became victims of lynchings and street violence. On Tuesday, fire spread over most of the city, destroying St. Paul’s Cathedral, and reaching as far as «River Fleet (one of London’s major subway rivers)» threatening Charles II’s Whitehall court, while coordinated firefighting efforts were simultaneously mobilized.

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